Brexit advice and support

As we know we are coming to the end of the transition period and come the 1st January we will become an independent coastal state. A lot of information is in the public domain and a lot of organisations are issuing guidance. Seafood Scotland has set up a Brexit Working Group and will work through the key issues with stakeholders and provide all the information you require to continue to trade on the 1st January 2021. Over the coming weeks Seafood Scotland and other key stakeholders will work together to provide easy to follow guidance, webinars and a forum to highlight issues and concerns that are not being addressed or where there is no clear guidance.




10th November

Webinars

Three webinars are being organised by Marine Scotland and Seafish to help seafood businesses prepare for changes to import and export processes for trade with the EU and Northern Ireland, that will come into effect from 1 January 2021. Click here for more information.

  • 12 November 10am – 11.30am  – Importing and exporting non-live fishery products –  Please register by emailing Jacquelyn.McDonald@gov.scot by 4pm on 11 November or sign in via Zoom Link – Meeting ID 844 3330 8159 / Passcode: 744400.
  • 18 November 10am – 11.30am – Importing and exporting live fishery products – sign in via Zoom Link – Meeting ID: 880 8018 6577 / Passcode: 089907
  • 2 December 10am – 11.30am – Moving goods under the Northern Ireland Protocol – sign in via Zoom Link – Meeting ID: 834 0155 3599 / Passcode: @8nFv#

 

EU Settlement Scheme
 
the UK has now left the EU.  EU citizens and their families will have to apply to the UK Government’s EU Settlement Scheme by 30 June 2021 in order to continue living, working and studying in the UK after that date.
 
Scotland deeply values the contribution EU citizens make to our society, culture and economy and we want people to stay in Scotland. We have produced a package of support to help guide people on how to apply to the EU Settlement Scheme.  
 
We need your help to get the word out to all EU citizens living in Scotland.  To help you do this we have created a Stay in Scotland Toolkit with a range of materials:

  • A3 poster
  • A5 information leaflets (available in English and 21 additional languages)
  • EU Exit Fact Sheet
  • Guides for EU Citizens and Employers
  • Radio advert
  • Animated gif
  • Static images
  • Suggested copy for use on website and social media channels

Download all the assets and toolkit via WeTransfer here: https://we.tl/t-yR4hkIr2me
 
We would be most grateful if you can print and display these in public spaces and areas visible to EU citizens and share across your networks using #WeAreScotland, pointing people to www.mygov.scot/stayinscotland
 
 
HMRC urges traders to act now to prepare for 1 January 2021
 
HMRC has written to VAT-registered traders highlighting actions they need to take to continue trading with the EU from 1 January 2021.
Below is also basic guidance taken from Gov.UK  as to when you are required to register for VAT
“You must register for VAT if:

  • you expect your VAT taxable turnover to be more than £85,000 in the next 30-day period
  • your business had a VAT taxable turnover of more than £85,000 over the last 12 months

You might also need to register in some other cases, depending on the kinds of goods or services you sell and where you sell them.
If you’ll exceed the VAT threshold in the next 30-day period
You must register if you realise that your total VAT taxable turnover is going to be more than £85,000 in the next 30-day period.
You have to register by the end of that 30-day period. Your effective date of registration is the date you realised, not the date your turnover went over the threshold.”

  • Border Operating Model.

Key aspects of the BOM:
 
From 1 January 2021, the model states that traders need to:

  • Understand the requirements of EU Member States. The necessary processes must have been done and documentation completed to comply with these requirements.
  • GB EORI – Traders will need a GB EORI number to move goods to or from the UK. Check your EORI number. Apply for a new one if yours does not start with GB.
  • EU EORI – If undertaking any EU customs processes, traders will need an EU EORI.
  • If you are an importer, check which goods are on the controlled goods list- If your good is on the controlled goods list, you will need to complete full customs declarations from January.
  • If you are importing non-controlled goods, decide whether to delay the customs declaration for up to six months or complete full customs declarations on import.
  • Decide how to complete customs formalities: Most traders are expected to use a customs intermediary. These are experts who can make declarations on your behalf.
  • Duty Deferment Account (DDA) – A DDA allows holders to delay customs duty, excise duty and import duty, to be paid once a month rather than on individual consignments.
  • Check to see if a facilitation would benefit the business- there are a number of facilitations, including the Common Transit Convention, to help import and export goods.
  • If you are importing live animals or high-priority plants and plant products, you need to be prepared for submitting additional documentation and checks taking place at point of destination.
  • If you are an exporter, be prepared to submit customs export declarations from January.
  • If you are a haulier, be ready to use the “Check an HGV is ready” service.

At this first stage, you do not need to:

  • Submit Safety & Security declarations.
  • Submit full customs declarations at the point of import, if you are importing a non-controlled good and you decide to delay your declaration for up to six months.
  • Traders importing non-controlled goods, covering everything from clothes to electronics, will need to prepare for basic customs requirements, such as keeping sufficient records of imported goods. Traders will also need to consider how they account for and pay VAT on imported goods. Traders will then have up to six months to complete customs declarations. While tariffs will be payable where due on relevant goods, payments can be deferred until the customs declaration has been made. UK Safety and Security declarations will not be required on imports for the first six months.
  • There will also be physical checks at the point of destination or other approved premises on all high-risk live animals and high-priority plants and plant products, and a requirement to obtain the relevant documentation and pre-notify for certain movements, but they will not be required to enter GB via a point of entry with an appropriate Border Control Post (BCP).
  • Export declarations and UK exit Safety and Security declarations will be required for all goods. Traders importing and exporting goods using the Common Transit Convention will need to follow all of the transit procedures – these will not be introduced in stages. The Goods Vehicle Movement Service (GVMS) will be introduced from January only for transit movements.

From April 2021:

  • All products of animal origin (POAO) and all regulated plants and plant products will also require pre-notification and the relevant health documentation. Any physical checks will continue to be conducted at the point of destination until July 2021.

From April 2021, you must:

  • If traders are importing Products of Animal Origin (POAO) or a regulated plant and plant product, traders must be prepared to submit pre-notification and the relevant health documentation.

You do not need to:

  • If you are not importing Products of Animal Origin or a regulated plant, you do not need to make any changes from January 2021 requirements.

From July 2021:

  • Traders moving any goods will have to make full customs declarations at the point of importation and pay relevant tariffs. Delaying declarations will not be possible.
  • Full Safety & Security declarations will be required, while for commodities subject to sanitary and phytosanitary (SPS) controls, these must arrive at an established point of entry with an appropriate BCP and there will be an increase in physical checks and the taking of samples. SPS checks for animals, plants and their products will take place at GB BCPs. The GVMS will be in place for all imports, exports and transit movements at border locations which have chosen to introduce it.
  • From July 2021, you must:
  • Meet full customs requirements including submitting declarations, regardless of whether it is a controlled or a non-controlled good, as well as paying VAT and excise duty where necessary
  • Submit Safety & Security declarations
  • Be prepared for customs compliance checks either at port or an inland site
  • Be prepared for relevant SPS goods to enter GB via a Border Control Post either at port or an inland site, accompanied by SPS documentary requirements.
  • You must not:
  • Fail to complete customs, VAT and excise requirements
  • Fail to submit goods to any necessary physical and documentary checks at GB Border Control Posts.

 
links to the Border Operating Model and UK and EU Border Control Posts – this information is available here:

Brexit Information Hub

Guidance on the Marine Scotland website
 
Marine Scotland produced guidance material on international trade in 2019, preparatory to a potential no-deal Brexit – guidance. We would urge you to visit this website in the first instance, and consider downloading the guidance leaflets and following up the links that would be relevant to your business.
 
Preparing for Brexit on Scottish Government website
 
For additional comprehensive guidance from the Scottish Government, please visit this website: preparing for Brexit.
 
Fishing Vessel Registration and Inspection by LA’s – URGENT
 
Marine Scotland believes there is now good industry knowledge about the requirement for all vessels intending to put their catch into an export supply chain to be a registered food business. This requires an inspection, which will be undertaken by Local Authority officials. Food Standards Scotland has been leading this initiative, and details can be found here: guidance.
 
Listed Food Businesses
 
Although this topic will potentially be covered in some of the other guidance referred to in this paper, please also see: guidance.
 
UK Transition website
 
As a general portal to all things related to the end of the transition period, the UK government has launched its Transition website.
 
The Border Operating Model
 
Much of the information you will need to trade with EU Member States, whether as an importer or an exporter, is contained within the recently published Border Operating Model. This is an extensive document, and much of it is not relevant to the seafood sector. Nevertheless, some of the generic guidance to importers and exporters is valuable, and there are specific sections related to seafood sector trade. Webinars are available. Importers should note the UK government’s proposal to phase the requirements for imports over the first six months of 2021. In addition, there is a UK government consultation for 2025.
 
 
How to import and export goods between Great Britain and the EU from 1 January 2021
 
HM Revenue and Customs put this guidance material online on the 13th of July.
 
Export Health Certificates
 
Seafood sector exporters will be aware of the need for Export Health Certificates after the end of the transition period, and this topic is covered in some of the other guidance referred to in this paper.  There is a lot of useful information contained within the following webpages. In addition you can search for available certificates. SG and FSS are proposing FSS leads on EHC provision at a minimum of two key logistics hubs in Scotland, which will operate a ‘groupage’ system to help food business export effectively and efficiently after the EU-exit transition period. More information will shortly be communicated, and will be available through the Brexit section of the FSS website: https://www.foodstandards.gov.scot/about-us/brexit
 
Marine and Fisheries Compliance
 
Effective monitoring and enforcement of marine and fishing laws is vital if we are to protect Scotland’s valuable marine areas and fisheries. It is important that these are protected by detecting breaches of fisheries regulations by monitoring and inspection at sea and in ports, and then reporting as appropriate to the prosecuting authorities, and by providing intelligence on fishing activity in the sea areas around Scotland. Comprehensive guidance on all relevant issues, and particularly Illegal, Unreported and Unregulated (IUU) fishing and Catch Certificates can be found here: guidance.
 
The Northern Ireland Protocol
 
The UK government recently published first a ‘command paper’ on the NI border, then the NI Business Guidance, which is intended to outline some of the requirements for the movement of goods between Great Britain and Northern Ireland. The guidance includes a section on moving consignments of fish from GB to NI, and for GB vessels landing fish directly into NI. Other aspects of the operation of the Northern Ireland Protocol are still subject to the outcome of negotiations. The working assumption is that Export Health Certificates (EHCs) will be required for trade in products of animal origin between GB and NI. Further guidance will be issued in due course.
 
MMO survey
 
The Marine Management Organisation has just launched a survey with registered users of the Catch Certificate system. MMO is only going to contact its English registered users, but there is an expectation that Scottish registered users should also get involved in the survey – and we would urge you to do so. The link to the survey is here.
 
 
Seafish Guidance
 
Seafish has produced guidance that will help prepare seafood businesses for the end of the transition period. It focusses on the day-to-day scenarios likely to be encountered. This includes food safety, traceability and trade, but does not cover issues arising from the UK’s future relationship with the EU.
 
Seafood Scotland Guidance
 
As Seafood Scotland notes “In light of the imminent departure of the United Kingdom from the European Union, it is essential that actions are taken by the Seafood industry to ensure continued success, deal or no deal”. The website contains helpful information and links.

27th October

Customs documentation.
 
This is an area that will be unfamiliar to a number of companies if you have only exported within the EU. Companies will need to decide who they want to use as a customs agent, a list can be found here  https://www.gov.uk/guidance/list-of-customs-agents-and-fast-parcel-operators
. It would also be beneficial for your company to also have knowledge within this area and there is funding available to support this training.
 
You can apply for 3 grants to help your business complete customs declarations.
You can apply to get funding for:

  • training that helps your business to complete customs declarations and processes
  • hiring new staff to help your business complete customs declarations
  • IT improvements to help your business complete customs declarations more efficiently

What you must use the grants for:

Recruitment
You must use the funding to cover the recruitment and salary costs of new employees, where the new employee started on or after 12 June 2020, who will help your business complete customs declarations.
You can also use the funding to cover the salary costs of employees who are redeployed from another part of your business in order to undertake customs declarations. These employees new roles must increase the capacity of the company to deal with customs declarations.

Training
The training must give you or your employees the skills to:

  • complete customs declarations
  • carry out customs processes – this can include relevant training in safety and security

The training does not have to lead to a formal qualification.
If you want to arrange the training internally, you can use the funding for the
cost of delivering the training, like related stationery, room hire, catering and travel and subsistence costs.
If the training will be delivered by an in-house trainer, you can also use the funding to cover the (reasonable) day rate of the trainer.
You cannot use the funding for other unrelated training
You can also use the grant to reimburse what your business has spent on relevant training since 12 June 2020.

IT improvements
You must use the funding to buy software that will help your business to complete customs declarations more efficiently.
It must be a ready-made solution – you cannot use the funding to commission bespoke software.
You can also use the funding to:

  • buy hardware that’s needed for the software to run
  • install and configure the software and hardware
  • buy the first year licence
  • train employees to use the software

You cannot use the funding for unrelated networking costs.
You can also use the grant to reimburse what your business has spent on relevant IT improvements since 12 June 2020.
You can apply for the funding here https://www.gov.uk/guidance/grants-for-businesses-that-complete-customs-declarations
 

Trade with non-EU countries at the end of Transition.

the UK is pursuing its own independent trade policy, having left the EU, including the Single Market and Customs Union (in the case of GB, at least). The UK had signed, in principle a new free trade agreement with Japan which, though not a like-for-like replacement of the EU-Japan FTA which came into force in February 2019, it is largely based on its provisions. This will come into force for the UK once we leave the Transition Period. The removal of tariffs as part of the agreement was destined to take many years, with full application of a tariff-free agreement for seafood not expected until 2033, it is understood that the UK-Japan agreement replicated the EU-Japan agreement with regard to seafood tariffs.

the UK was also now in trade negotiations with the United States, Australia and New Zealand, and seeking accession to the Comprehensive and Progressive Agreement for Trans-Pacific Partnership (CPTPP). This agreement includes countries like Mexico, Australia, Japan, Singapore and Canada and is the third largest free trade area under an overarching agreement in the world. RL also added that the UK was additionally in bilateral negotiations to try to replicate as far as possible EU agreements with the likes of Canada, Mexico and Vietnam. RL went on to confirm that trade agreements with two of the three EEA-EFTA countries (Iceland and Norway), as well as agreements with Turkey and a number of countries in the Western Balkans, were still under negotiation, while a trade and cooperation agreement with Ukraine has actually been announced earlier in the day. RD confirmed that Ukraine was one of the main export markets for Scottish mackerel.  

Negotiations with Iceland and Norway are closely linked to the negotiations with the EU before adding that rollover trade agreements had already been negotiated and agreed with Switzerland, Liechtenstein, the Faroe Islands and various North African and Middle Eastern countries. RL confirmed that, in total, there were about 19 finalised rolled over agreements with about 18 others that are still being negotiated but with no guarantees that these will be finalised by the end of the Transition Period.

sometimes there is a lack of clarity on the practical implications of agreements either being signed or lapsing but that DIT has improved their reporting of details on their website recently. Without an agreement, it should be expected by companies that WTO Rules would underpin the trade relationships in question and that Most Favoured Nation (MFN) tariffs would apply.
  
Information on UK trade agreements with non-EU countries – this information is available here:
https://www.gov.uk/guidance/uk-trade-agreements-with-non-eu-countries ; https://www.gov.uk/government/news/negotiations-on-the-uks-future-trading-relationship-with-the-australia-update ;
https://www.gov.uk/government/news/negotiations-on-the-uks-future-trading-relationship-with-new-zealand-update ;
https://www.gov.uk/government/news/negotiations-on-the-uks-future-trading-relationship-with-the-us-update–3 ;
https://www.gov.uk/government/news/uk-takes-major-step-towards-membership-of-trans-pacific-free-trade-area

Tariffs:
Companies need to familiarise themselves with databases and commodity codes covering tariffs if they haven’t already, and likewise any Rules of Origin that may apply in any new trade agreements, either with the EU or other blocs or countries. These are important both for the purposes of exporting and importing.

Information on tariff databases – this information is available here:
https://www.gov.uk/guidance/uk-tariffs-from-1-january-2021 ;
https://www.gov.uk/guidance/finding-commodity-codes-for-imports-or-exports ;
https://www.gov.uk/topic/business-tax/import-export ;
https://www.gov.uk/guidance/rules-of-origin ;
https://www.gov.uk/trade-tariff ;
https://madb.europa.eu/madb/indexPubli.htm

Operation Brock
 
What UK Government proposed in their Consultation
 
We outlined that there may be a need for a contingency plan which would provide certain commodities the opportunity to bypass part of the Operation Brock system if queues build up.
We set out the government’s view that prioritisation of goods would be justifiable if 2 or more of the following criteria were met:

  • the goods are highly perishable and will lose most of, or all their value, within 5 days or less (for example, without additional refrigeration, freezing or other intervention, which would not be possible)
  • the ‘perishable’ goods concerned are live animals and would give rise to animal welfare concerns if not moved in a timely manner
  • delays to the goods would give rise to a disproportionate economic impact on a geographical area of the UK

Based upon the criteria above, the government identified 2 sectors where a contingency to prioritise goods would be justifiable. These were single loads of live or fresh seafood products for human consumption, or of day-old chicks. These products are highly perishable and are highly dependent upon being exported through the Short Straits (as the most efficient route to the EU market, or as transit for onward movement to third countries) in a timely and financially viable fashion. DOCs are live animals and must arrive at their destination within 72 hours of hatching, to ensure compliance with animal health legislation. They cannot be fed in their vehicle and delays risk dehydration and mortality.

Government response
The overall response to the proposed contingency arrangements for prioritising these goods was positive, so we’ll be taking forward our proposals.
Defra estimates that on average about 70 HCVs a day would be carrying live or fresh seafood products or DOCs. In the context of the overall volumes of vehicles using the Short Straits, we consider that this is a small enough number to accommodate such arrangements. A specific route for the prioritised vehicles has been agreed with the KRF, with use of the contraflow past the Operation Brock queues by outbound HCVs conditional on having a ‘priority goods permit’. Using the contraflow without the requisite permit could see the HCV driver stopped and fined.
In summary, implementation of a prioritisation approach will work as follows:

  • a driver of a prioritised HCV would need to obtain a valid KAP from the ‘Check an HGV’ service
  • they would then be instructed to travel to a Prioritisation Control Site (PCS) where the presence of a valid KAP would be confirmed. If they do not have a valid KAP, they’d be liable to be issued with an FPN and fine. Further guidance on the location of the PCS and the instructions on when the site is in use will be confirmed shortly
  • if the ‘Check an HGV’ service were unavailable, a manual border readiness check would also be conducted at the PCS
  • an HCV carrying prioritised exports that was deemed to be border ready and with a valid KAP, will be issued with a physical Priority Goods Permit and 2 retro-reflective stickers (one to be displayed at the front and back of the vehicle), and would be allowed to proceed down the priority route to the border, using the contraflow to bypass the Operation Brock queues

To reduce the risk of abuse, document checks and some spot checks (that is, physical inspections of the cargo of the HCV) would be conducted at the PCS to ensure the load is as stated, and qualifies for prioritisation.
Those found to be abusing the system, that is, not carrying only priority goods, would be issued a £300 fine and instructed, if in possession of a valid KAP, to proceed via the normal, prescribed route, joining any queues that have formed
No further commodities have been deemed to meet the criteria for prioritisation for the purpose of this contingency plan
https://www.gov.uk/government/consultations/enforcing-operation-brock-plans-in-2021/outcome/enforcing-operation-brock-in-2021-government-response-to-consultation-on-proposed-legislative-amendments
 
 
Migration Advisory Committee (MAC) Final Report on UK Shortage Occupation List (SOL) – recommendations to UK Govt, the MAC’s recommendations relevant to the seafood sector are:

  • The MAC recommends partially adding SOC code 5119 (agricultural and fishing trades n.e.c.) to the UK SOL only for those in the fishing industry.

This occupation is ranked low on the RQF3-5 shortage indicators and the vacancy to employee ratio is well below the median for eligible occupations.
However, stakeholders in the fishing industry have stated their concerns and there is evidence to suggest a UK-wide shortage in this part of the occupation.
Job roles including ‘captain’, ‘skipper’ and ‘fisherman’ are classified under SOC 5119.

  • The MAC recommends classifying ‘deckhands on large fishing vessels (9 metres and above)’ under SOC code 9119 as RQF3 and therefore to be eligible for the Skilled Worker route.

For this job title, they recommend including a requirement for the applicant to have at least three years full time experience using their skills.
The MAC said they recognise that there may be operational challenges given the rules on operating inside compared to outside territorial waters, which the Home Office will want to consider. Other relevant roles under code 9119 (including fish husbandry in the aquaculture sector) are not recommended for classifying/upgrading to RQF3.

  • All jobs in occupation code 2112 (biological scientists and biochemists – includes broodstock geneticists) are recommended to go on UK SOL (relevant to aquaculture).
  • The MAC does not recommend adding SOC Code 5433 (fishmongers, fish processors and poultry dressers) to the UK SOL but does recommend inclusion to the NI-only SOL.
  • The MAC does not recommend adding SOC code 4134 (transport and distribution clerks and assistants) to the UK SOL.

The online job posts to employee ratio is above the median, however, the occupation ranks low by RQF3-5 shortage indicator rank and pay growth has been negative (2016-2019). Although some stakeholder evidence highlighting difficulties was received, on balance there was not enough evidence in the MAC’s view to indicate a UK-wide shortage.

  • It is unclear/not explicit but SOC Code 8211 (drivers of large goods vehicles) does not appear to be recommended for classifying/upgrading to RQF3 and thus is not eligible for inclusion on the UK SOL.
  • Occupations below RQF3 have never been eligible for the current Tier 2 (General) route and will not be eligible for the new Skilled Worker route.

The report is available here: https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/922019/SOL_2020_Report_Final.pdf

 

13th October

Government publishes updated GB-EU border operating model
On Thursday 8 October the Government published an updated Border Operating Model, which provides further detail on how the GB-EU border will work and the actions that traders, hauliers and passengers need to take. 

The updated GB-EU Border Operating Model:

  • Maps out the intended locations of inland border infrastructure. The sites will provide additional capacity to carry out checks on freight.
  • Announces that passports will be required for entry into the UK from October 2021 as the Government phases out the use of EU, EEA and Swiss national identity cards.
  • Confirms, after extensive engagement with industry, that a Kent Access Permit will be mandatory for HGVs over 7.5 tonnes using the short strait channel crossings in Kent. The easy-to-use ‘Check an HGV’ service will allow hauliers to check if they have the correct customs documentation and obtain a Kent Access Permit.

Exports of seafood to the EU
Exporters are encouraged to take three simple steps:

  1. Go online and apply for a GB EORI number (a number which helps customs identify their goods). You will need this to trade with the EU after 31 December 2020.
  2. Decide how you want to fulfil new customs requirements – some businesses will do this themselves; many will want to use a customs agent or intermediary and should identify one now.
  3. Talk to businesses in the EU you trade with to ensure they are familiar with the new import requirements from the end of the transition period.

Details of the specific requirements for exporting fish and shellfish are provided from page 167 of the Border Operating model.

Imports of seafood from the EU
The UK Government has taken the decision to introduce the new border controls in three stages up until 1 July 2021to give industry extra time to make necessary arrangements.

The stages are:

1. From January 2021: Most imports of marine caught fish and some shellfish will need to be accompanied by a Catch Certificate (and other relevant IUU documents as required).EU-registered fishing vessels intending to land their catch directly into GB must land into an appropriately designated port in line with IUU fishing rules and the North East Atlantic Fisheries Commission (NEAFC) convention.

2. From April 2021: there will be new requirements for fishery products for human consumption to be accompanied by an EHC. There will also be new requirements for importers to submit prenotifications for fishery products via IPAFFS in advance of the goods’ arrival

3. From July 2021: Commodities subject to sanitary and phytosanitary (SPS) controls, these must arrive at an established point of entry with an appropriate BCP.
Further details of the import requirements for seafood are on pages 61, 94 and 123 of the Border Operating Model.

EHC Online registration now open
From 1 January 2021 all exports of fish and seafood, including aquaculture products, except direct landings of fish from UK-flagged fishing vessels to the EU will require an Export Health Certificate (EHC). Exporters can apply for EHCs online and can register for the online service before their first application is made. You can prepare now by registering via gov.uk. Guidance is available on how to get an EHC and when is the right time to apply here. You can also view examples of EU EHCs on Defra’s Form Finder

Protecting food and drink names from 1 January 2021 – new UK GI logos
On 28 September the new UK GI logos were made available to download on GOV.UK. These logos, and the rules for using them, were shared with GI producers, retailers and enforcement bodies via email. The GIs policy team will be hosting an online teach-in session on the new UK GI schemes. Please contact the team at protectedfoodnames@defra.gov.uk if you would like to attend.

Funding Support for Remote Training in Scotland’s Seafood Industry 
There is still a very limited amount of funding support available for seafood companies to undertake training. Full details of the courses can be found here

Production Staff Wanted
There is a growing number of companies throughout Scotland making contact with vacancies within their operations. If any companies are making redundancies or knows of anyone looking for employment can they please contact enquiries@seafoodscotland.org

30th September

Last week we highlighted the very first step companies should be doing if they haven’t already done so is the Check, Change, Go survey here which will highlight any gaps in your preparations. Hopefully you have already done this.

DEFRA have organised a series of webinars to assist you with your preparations for the end of the transition period. The webinars are scheduled take place throughout October and November and will provide key information to enable you to continue exporting your products from Great Britain to the European Union. To register for these webinars it is done through zoom and I cannot link the register address onto this newsletter. If you are interested in any of the events below please let me know and I will send you the link details by email – apologies.

 Exporting Products of Animal Origin (POAO) from Great Britain to the European Union

Thursday 15 October 2020 10:30am -12:00pm

This session will cover:
• The steps businesses need to follow to export products of animal origin from Great Britain (GB) to the European Union (EU)
• The preparation steps that can be taken before the 31 December 2020
• Information on guidance documentation and links for further information
• Where businesses can get support and advice lines available
• An opportunity to ask questions to a panel of experts

Exporting Fish and Fishery Products from Great Britain to the European Union

Monday 19 October 2020 10:30am -12:00pm

This session will cover:
• The steps businesses need to follow to export fish and fishery products from Great Britain (GB) to the European Union (EU)
• The preparation steps that can be taken before the 31 December 2020
• Information on guidance documentation and links for further information • Where businesses can get support and advice lines available
• An opportunity to ask questions to a panel of experts 

Export Health Certificate requirements from 1 January 2021 – Live Animals / Live Stock

Thursday 22 October 2020 09:30am – 11:00am

This session will cover:
• What are Export Health Certificates (EHC)?
• Why do I need an and how do I obtain one?
• EHC online service – registration and demonstration of system
• Role of a Certifying Officer
• Where businesses can get support and advice lines available
• An opportunity to ask questions to a panel of experts Note: In this session a live animals or livestock EHC will be used as an example for the online system demonstration

Export Health Certificate requirements from 1 January 2021 – Fish

Monday 9 November 2020 09:30am – 11:00am

This session will cover:
• What are Export Health Certificates (EHC)?
• Why do I need an EHC and how do I obtain one?
• EHC online service – registration and demonstration of system
• Role of a Certifying Officer
• Where businesses can get support and advice lines available
• An opportunity to ask questions to a panel of experts Note: In this session a fish EHC will be used as an example for the online system demonstration

Exporting Marketing Standards / Labelling / Health ID Marks from Great Britain to the European Union

Tuesday 3 November 2020 11:30am – 12:30pm

This session will cover:
• Understand marketing standards for your goods
• How you need to label your good to export to the European Union (EU)
• What health ID marks are available and how to use them for good you export to the EU
• Where businesses can get support and advice lines available
• An opportunity to ask questions to a panel of experts 
 

EMPLOYING TALENT FROM EUROPE AND BEYOND Webinar:
What’s changing in Jan 2021 and how this impacts current Tier 2 licence holders

14th October 10-11am 

What’s changing in January 2021 and how this impacts current Tier 2 licence holders For Scottish employers faced with skills shortages in the domestic labour market, recruiting talent from overseas is often critical to the growth of the business. With the imminent changes to the UK immigration system as a result of Brexit, the aim of this webinar is to inform companies who already have a sponsor licence on what is changing once free movement of people ends. This 60 minute webinar is aimed at Scottish based SMEs. The webinar will be led by TalentScotland and supported by their immigration specialists Brodies LLP and will cover: • Overview of the new UK immigration system • Who is exempt from sponsorship • What you can do to prepare now • Potential Costs and time associated with this • Brief overview of Tier 2 sponsorship duties • Outline of support available through TalentScotland

Register here.

 

Brexit Information Hub

Guidance on the Marine Scotland website
 
Marine Scotland produced guidance material on international trade in 2019, preparatory to a potential no-deal Brexit – guidance. We would urge you to visit this website in the first instance, and consider downloading the guidance leaflets and following up the links that would be relevant to your business.
 
Preparing for Brexit on Scottish Government website
 
For additional comprehensive guidance from the Scottish Government, please visit this website: preparing for Brexit.
 
Fishing Vessel Registration and Inspection by LA’s – URGENT
 
Marine Scotland believes there is now good industry knowledge about the requirement for all vessels intending to put their catch into an export supply chain to be a registered food business. This requires an inspection, which will be undertaken by Local Authority officials. Food Standards Scotland has been leading this initiative, and details can be found here: guidance.
 
Listed Food Businesses
 
Although this topic will potentially be covered in some of the other guidance referred to in this paper, please also see: guidance.
 
UK Transition website
 
As a general portal to all things related to the end of the transition period, the UK government has launched its Transition website.
 
The Border Operating Model
 
Much of the information you will need to trade with EU Member States, whether as an importer or an exporter, is contained within the recently published Border Operating Model. This is an extensive document, and much of it is not relevant to the seafood sector. Nevertheless, some of the generic guidance to importers and exporters is valuable, and there are specific sections related to seafood sector trade. Webinars are available. Importers should note the UK government’s proposal to phase the requirements for imports over the first six months of 2021. In addition, there is a UK government consultation for 2025.
 
 
How to import and export goods between Great Britain and the EU from 1 January 2021
 
HM Revenue and Customs put this guidance material online on the 13th of July.
 
Export Health Certificates
 
Seafood sector exporters will be aware of the need for Export Health Certificates after the end of the transition period, and this topic is covered in some of the other guidance referred to in this paper.  There is a lot of useful information contained within the following webpages. In addition you can search for available certificates. SG and FSS are proposing FSS leads on EHC provision at a minimum of two key logistics hubs in Scotland, which will operate a ‘groupage’ system to help food business export effectively and efficiently after the EU-exit transition period. More information will shortly be communicated, and will be available through the Brexit section of the FSS website: https://www.foodstandards.gov.scot/about-us/brexit
 
Marine and Fisheries Compliance
 
Effective monitoring and enforcement of marine and fishing laws is vital if we are to protect Scotland’s valuable marine areas and fisheries. It is important that these are protected by detecting breaches of fisheries regulations by monitoring and inspection at sea and in ports, and then reporting as appropriate to the prosecuting authorities, and by providing intelligence on fishing activity in the sea areas around Scotland. Comprehensive guidance on all relevant issues, and particularly Illegal, Unreported and Unregulated (IUU) fishing and Catch Certificates can be found here: guidance.
 
The Northern Ireland Protocol
 
The UK government recently published first a ‘command paper’ on the NI border, then the NI Business Guidance, which is intended to outline some of the requirements for the movement of goods between Great Britain and Northern Ireland. The guidance includes a section on moving consignments of fish from GB to NI, and for GB vessels landing fish directly into NI. Other aspects of the operation of the Northern Ireland Protocol are still subject to the outcome of negotiations. The working assumption is that Export Health Certificates (EHCs) will be required for trade in products of animal origin between GB and NI. Further guidance will be issued in due course.
 
MMO survey
 
The Marine Management Organisation has just launched a survey with registered users of the Catch Certificate system. MMO is only going to contact its English registered users, but there is an expectation that Scottish registered users should also get involved in the survey – and we would urge you to do so. The link to the survey is here.
 
 
Seafish Guidance
 
Seafish has produced guidance that will help prepare seafood businesses for the end of the transition period. It focusses on the day-to-day scenarios likely to be encountered. This includes food safety, traceability and trade, but does not cover issues arising from the UK’s future relationship with the EU.
 
Seafood Scotland Guidance
 
As Seafood Scotland notes “In light of the imminent departure of the United Kingdom from the European Union, it is essential that actions are taken by the Seafood industry to ensure continued success, deal or no deal”. The website contains helpful information and links.

22nd September

As we know we are coming to the end of the transition period and come the 1st January we will become an independent coastal state. A lot of information is in the public domain and a lot of organisations are issuing guidance. Seafood Scotland has set up a Brexit Working Group and will work through the key issues with stakeholders and provide all the information you require to continue to trade on the 1st January 2021. Over the coming weeks Seafood Scotland and other key stakeholders will work together to provide easy to follow guidance, webinars and a forum to highlight issues and concerns that are not being addressed or where there is no clear guidance.

In the blue box below you will see the guidance that has been produced by Scottish Government Brexit team for anyone wanting to access further information. We will be breaking this information down over the coming weeks for key subjects.

Last week we highlighted the very first step companies should be doing if they haven’t already done so is the Check, Change, Go survey here which will highlight any gaps in your preparations. Hopefully you have already done this.

DEFRA have organised a series of webinars to assist you with your preparations for the end of the transition period. The webinars are scheduled take place throughout October and November and will provide key information to enable you to continue exporting your products from Great Britain to the European Union. Please see relevant webinar details below

 Exporting Products of Animal Origin (POAO) from Great Britain to the European Union

Thursday 15 October 2020 10:30am -12:00pm

This session will cover:
• The steps businesses need to follow to export products of animal origin from Great Britain (GB) to the European Union (EU)
• The preparation steps that can be taken before the 31 December 2020
• Information on guidance documentation and links for further information
• Where businesses can get support and advice lines available
• An opportunity to ask questions to a panel of experts
Register here 

Exporting Fish and Fishery Products from Great Britain to the European Union

Monday 19 October 2020 10:30am -12:00pm

This session will cover:
• The steps businesses need to follow to export fish and fishery products from Great Britain (GB) to the European Union (EU)
• The preparation steps that can be taken before the 31 December 2020
• Information on guidance documentation and links for further information • Where businesses can get support and advice lines available
• An opportunity to ask questions to a panel of experts 
Register here

Export Health Certificate requirements from 1 January 2021 – Live Animals / Live Stock

Thursday 22 October 2020 09:30am – 11:00am

This session will cover:
• What are Export Health Certificates (EHC)?
• Why do I need an and how do I obtain one?
• EHC online service – registration and demonstration of system
• Role of a Certifying Officer
• Where businesses can get support and advice lines available
• An opportunity to ask questions to a panel of experts Note: In this session a live animals or livestock EHC will be used as an example for the online system demonstration
Register here

Export Health Certificate requirements from 1 January 2021 – Fish

Monday 9 November 2020 09:30am – 11:00am

This session will cover:
• What are Export Health Certificates (EHC)?
• Why do I need an EHC and how do I obtain one?
• EHC online service – registration and demonstration of system
• Role of a Certifying Officer
• Where businesses can get support and advice lines available
• An opportunity to ask questions to a panel of experts Note: In this session a fish EHC will be used as an example for the online system demonstration
Register here

Exporting Marketing Standards / Labelling / Health ID Marks from Great Britain to the European Union

Tuesday 3 November 2020 11:30am – 12:30pm

This session will cover:
• Understand marketing standards for your goods
• How you need to label your good to export to the European Union (EU)
• What health ID marks are available and how to use them for good you export to the EU
• Where businesses can get support and advice lines available
• An opportunity to ask questions to a panel of experts 
Register here.

 

Brexit Information Hub

Guidance on the Marine Scotland website
 
Marine Scotland produced guidance material on international trade in 2019, preparatory to a potential no-deal Brexit – guidance. We would urge you to visit this website in the first instance, and consider downloading the guidance leaflets and following up the links that would be relevant to your business.
 
Preparing for Brexit on Scottish Government website
 
For additional comprehensive guidance from the Scottish Government, please visit this website: preparing for Brexit.
 
Fishing Vessel Registration and Inspection by LA’s – URGENT
 
Marine Scotland believes there is now good industry knowledge about the requirement for all vessels intending to put their catch into an export supply chain to be a registered food business. This requires an inspection, which will be undertaken by Local Authority officials. Food Standards Scotland has been leading this initiative, and details can be found here: guidance.
 
Listed Food Businesses
 
Although this topic will potentially be covered in some of the other guidance referred to in this paper, please also see: guidance.
 
UK Transition website
 
As a general portal to all things related to the end of the transition period, the UK government has launched its Transition website.
 
The Border Operating Model
 
Much of the information you will need to trade with EU Member States, whether as an importer or an exporter, is contained within the recently published Border Operating Model. This is an extensive document, and much of it is not relevant to the seafood sector. Nevertheless, some of the generic guidance to importers and exporters is valuable, and there are specific sections related to seafood sector trade. Webinars are available. Importers should note the UK government’s proposal to phase the requirements for imports over the first six months of 2021. In addition, there is a UK government consultation for 2025.
 
 
How to import and export goods between Great Britain and the EU from 1 January 2021
 
HM Revenue and Customs put this guidance material online on the 13th of July.
 
Export Health Certificates
 
Seafood sector exporters will be aware of the need for Export Health Certificates after the end of the transition period, and this topic is covered in some of the other guidance referred to in this paper.  There is a lot of useful information contained within the following webpages. In addition you can search for available certificates. SG and FSS are proposing FSS leads on EHC provision at a minimum of two key logistics hubs in Scotland, which will operate a ‘groupage’ system to help food business export effectively and efficiently after the EU-exit transition period. More information will shortly be communicated, and will be available through the Brexit section of the FSS website: https://www.foodstandards.gov.scot/about-us/brexit
 
Marine and Fisheries Compliance
 
Effective monitoring and enforcement of marine and fishing laws is vital if we are to protect Scotland’s valuable marine areas and fisheries. It is important that these are protected by detecting breaches of fisheries regulations by monitoring and inspection at sea and in ports, and then reporting as appropriate to the prosecuting authorities, and by providing intelligence on fishing activity in the sea areas around Scotland. Comprehensive guidance on all relevant issues, and particularly Illegal, Unreported and Unregulated (IUU) fishing and Catch Certificates can be found here: guidance.
 
The Northern Ireland Protocol
 
The UK government recently published first a ‘command paper’ on the NI border, then the NI Business Guidance, which is intended to outline some of the requirements for the movement of goods between Great Britain and Northern Ireland. The guidance includes a section on moving consignments of fish from GB to NI, and for GB vessels landing fish directly into NI. Other aspects of the operation of the Northern Ireland Protocol are still subject to the outcome of negotiations. The working assumption is that Export Health Certificates (EHCs) will be required for trade in products of animal origin between GB and NI. Further guidance will be issued in due course.
 
MMO survey
 
The Marine Management Organisation has just launched a survey with registered users of the Catch Certificate system. MMO is only going to contact its English registered users, but there is an expectation that Scottish registered users should also get involved in the survey – and we would urge you to do so. The link to the survey is here.
 
 
Seafish Guidance
 
Seafish has produced guidance that will help prepare seafood businesses for the end of the transition period. It focusses on the day-to-day scenarios likely to be encountered. This includes food safety, traceability and trade, but does not cover issues arising from the UK’s future relationship with the EU.
 
Seafood Scotland Guidance
 
As Seafood Scotland notes “In light of the imminent departure of the United Kingdom from the European Union, it is essential that actions are taken by the Seafood industry to ensure continued success, deal or no deal”. The website contains helpful information and links.
 

15th September

Guidance on the Marine Scotland website
 
Marine Scotland produced guidance material on international trade in 2019, preparatory to a potential no-deal Brexit – guidance. We would urge you to visit this website in the first instance, and consider downloading the guidance leaflets and following up the links that would be relevant to your business.
 
Preparing for Brexit on Scottish Government website
 
For additional comprehensive guidance from the Scottish Government, please visit this website: preparing for Brexit.
 
Fishing Vessel Registration and Inspection by LA’s – URGENT
 
Marine Scotland believes there is now good industry knowledge about the requirement for all vessels intending to put their catch into an export supply chain to be a registered food business. This requires an inspection, which will be undertaken by Local Authority officials. Food Standards Scotland has been leading this initiative, and details can be found here: guidance.
 
Listed Food Businesses
 
Although this topic will potentially be covered in some of the other guidance referred to in this paper, please also see: guidance.
 
UK Transition website
 
As a general portal to all things related to the end of the transition period, the UK government has launched its Transition website.
 
The Border Operating Model
 
Much of the information you will need to trade with EU Member States, whether as an importer or an exporter, is contained within the recently published Border Operating Model. This is an extensive document, and much of it is not relevant to the seafood sector. Nevertheless, some of the generic guidance to importers and exporters is valuable, and there are specific sections related to seafood sector trade. Webinars are available. Importers should note the UK government’s proposal to phase the requirements for imports over the first six months of 2021. In addition, there is a UK government consultation for 2025.
 
 
How to import and export goods between Great Britain and the EU from 1 January 2021
 
HM Revenue and Customs put this guidance material online on the 13th of July.
 
Export Health Certificates
 
Seafood sector exporters will be aware of the need for Export Health Certificates after the end of the transition period, and this topic is covered in some of the other guidance referred to in this paper.  There is a lot of useful information contained within the following webpages. In addition you can search for available certificates. SG and FSS are proposing FSS leads on EHC provision at a minimum of two key logistics hubs in Scotland, which will operate a ‘groupage’ system to help food business export effectively and efficiently after the EU-exit transition period. More information will shortly be communicated, and will be available through the Brexit section of the FSS website: https://www.foodstandards.gov.scot/about-us/brexit
 
Marine and Fisheries Compliance
 
Effective monitoring and enforcement of marine and fishing laws is vital if we are to protect Scotland’s valuable marine areas and fisheries. It is important that these are protected by detecting breaches of fisheries regulations by monitoring and inspection at sea and in ports, and then reporting as appropriate to the prosecuting authorities, and by providing intelligence on fishing activity in the sea areas around Scotland. Comprehensive guidance on all relevant issues, and particularly Illegal, Unreported and Unregulated (IUU) fishing and Catch Certificates can be found here: guidance.
 
The Northern Ireland Protocol
 
The UK government recently published first a ‘command paper’ on the NI border, then the NI Business Guidance, which is intended to outline some of the requirements for the movement of goods between Great Britain and Northern Ireland. The guidance includes a section on moving consignments of fish from GB to NI, and for GB vessels landing fish directly into NI. Other aspects of the operation of the Northern Ireland Protocol are still subject to the outcome of negotiations. The working assumption is that Export Health Certificates (EHCs) will be required for trade in products of animal origin between GB and NI. Further guidance will be issued in due course.
 
MMO survey
 
The Marine Management Organisation has just launched a survey with registered users of the Catch Certificate system. MMO is only going to contact its English registered users, but there is an expectation that Scottish registered users should also get involved in the survey – and we would urge you to do so. The link to the survey is here.
 
 
Seafish Guidance
 
Seafish has produced guidance that will help prepare seafood businesses for the end of the transition period. It focusses on the day-to-day scenarios likely to be encountered. This includes food safety, traceability and trade, but does not cover issues arising from the UK’s future relationship with the EU.
 
Seafood Scotland Guidance
 
As Seafood Scotland notes “In light of the imminent departure of the United Kingdom from the European Union, it is essential that actions are taken by the Seafood industry to ensure continued success, deal or no deal”. The website contains helpful information and links.









Enquiries





    Seafood Scotland, 1f1 Ratho Park One, 88 Glasgow Road, Newbridge, EH28 8PP, UK +44 (0)131 557 9344